Technology

The ladder-climbing robotic snake and other news

[ad_1] BBC Click's Nick Kwek looks at some of the best technology news stories of the week including: Google announces it is shutting down the majority of its social network, Google+, after user data was left exposed Augmented reality company, Magic Leap, holds its first developers conference University researchers at Kyoto University and the University of Electro-Communications create a robotic snake that can climb ladders See more at Click's website
Technology

Call of Duty: Why we put ‘own twist’ on Battle Royale mode

[ad_1] Radio 1 Newsbeat's had exclusive access to the team behind the new Call of Duty.They explain why they've introduced a Battle Royale mode for the first time, following the huge success of titles like Fortnite and PUBG.Follow Newsbeat on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter.Listen to Newsbeat live at 12:45 and 17:45 every weekday on BBC Radio 1 and 1Xtra - if you miss us you can listen back here. [ad_2]
Technology

Sky battles: Fighting back against rogue drones

[ad_1] Image copyright OpenWorks Engineering Image caption A New Orleans police officer shoulders a drone capture "gun" Rogue drones have nearly caused air accidents, have been used as offensive weapons, to deliver drugs to prisoners, and to spy on people. So how can we fight back? This summer a packed Airbus A321 came within 100ft (30m) of disaster after encountering a drone at 15,500ft.And the number of near-misses of this
Technology

Microsoft tackles ‘horrifying’ Bing search results

[ad_1] Image copyright Microsoft Image caption Microsoft's search engine has been suggesting people visit racist sites Microsoft has "taken action" to change its Bing search engine after it was found to give "horrifying" results for some terms.Journalist Chris Hoffman discovered Bing suggested racist topics when he looked up words such as "Jews", "Muslims" and "black people".Bing also ranked widely debunked conspiracy theories among the top suggestions for other words.Mr Hoffman
Technology

WhatsApp fixes ‘big deal’ video crash bug

[ad_1] Image copyright Reuters Image caption The bug made answering some video calls risky Answering a booby-trapped video call via the WhatsApp messaging service could force the app to crash and close, a security expert has found.The bug was a "big deal" said researcher Tavis Ormandy, who is part of the team that found it.It was found in the messaging service's apps used on Android and Apple smartphones.The software loophole
Technology

US weapons systems can be ‘easily hacked’

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Most weapons systems, including the F-35 jet, were found to be vulnerable to cyber-attack Some of the most cutting-edge weapons in the US's military arsenal can be "easily hacked" using "basic tools", a government report has concluded.The Government Accountability Office (GAO) found "mission-critical" cyber-vulnerabilities in nearly all weapons systems tested between 2012 and 2017.That includes the newest F-35 jet as well as missile
Technology

How light could help superfast mobile reach even further

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Internet connectivity through light waves could help 5G reach into buildings and underground The global race towards superfast "fifth generation" mobile internet, known as 5G, is entering a key phase. The trouble is no-one knows exactly which technologies will be best for offering such a service. But one telecoms firm may just have had a light-bulb moment.At its headquarters in Slough, O2 has
Technology

Virtual lives: Could VR change how we think of others?

[ad_1] Researchers are studying whether “embodiment” - where you can see and control a virtual reality body - has effects in the real world.Some experiments have suggested that giving people a virtual body can improve cognitive abilities and enhance their interest in a particular subject or reduce racial bias and domestic violence.BBC Click finds out more.See more at Click's website and @BBCClick. [ad_2] Source link
Technology

BBC News disrupted by software glitch

[ad_1] Image caption Bulletins on the BBC News channel showed recorded material from 15:00 BST The BBC had to replace live broadcasts with recorded material on its TV news channels for about an hour on Wednesday following a technical glitch.The issue affected OpenMedia, a new computer system rolled out across BBC News outlets over the past six months.The software's supplier, Annova, has been helping to investigate the fault's cause. Engineers