Science/Nature

Discovering King Tutankhamun’s tomb: Harry Burton’s photographs

[ad_1] Image copyright Griffith Institute/Oxford University Image caption The inlaid beard normally seen on the mask was attached in the 1940s A new exhibition reappraises the work of Harry Burton, who photographed the decade-long Tutankhamun excavation. The collection is a striking record of a groundbreaking moment in our study of the past.It was one of the most remarkable archaeological discoveries of the 20th Century.But what was it like to first
Science/Nature

Exomoons: on the hunt for distant worlds

[ad_1] Image copyright Grace Elizabeth Harrison Image caption Artist's impression: An exomoon orbits a distant planet The search for exoplanets, which orbit distant stars, has opened up a whole galaxy of worlds beyond our own. Over 3,700 have been discovered to date, but they may have companions.Since the first confirmed discovery of planets beyond our own Solar System over 20 years ago, we have known that our stellar neighbourhood is
Science/Nature

Court bid to save young from climate change

[ad_1] Image copyright Plan B Image caption Plan B during a preliminary court hearing An activist group hopes to sue the UK government over climate change, arguing that it is discriminating against the young by failing to cut emissions fast enough.The campaigners - known collectively as Plan B - argue that if the UK postpones emissions cuts, the next generation will be left to pick up the bill.It is seeking
Science/Nature

Newborn planet pictured for first time

[ad_1] Image copyright ESO / A. Müller et al. Image caption The planet is visible to the right of its star, which has been obscured Astronomers have captured the image of a planet that's still forming in the disk of gas and dust around its star.Researchers have long been on the hunt for a baby planet, and this is the first confirmed discovery of its kind.Young dwarf star PDS 70
Science/Nature

Saving koalas: Gene study promises solution to deadly sex disease

[ad_1] Image copyright GREG WOOD Despite being (possibly) the world's cuddliest creature, the super-sweet koala is also one of the unluckiest animals on the planet.Australia's most famous tree hugger has been decimated by sexually transmitted disease, attacks from dogs, being hit by cars and by habitat loss.Chlamydia has spread fast in koalas, causing infertility and blindness.But scientists say decoding the genome should lead to an effective vaccine for the STD.
Science/Nature

‘The ocean is my home – and it’s being trashed’

[ad_1] Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionSteve, Connor and Sarah: "Fleet science can accelerate knowledge and awareness" "If you opened your curtains in the morning and found that the grass was scorched, somebody had dumped a load of rubbish in your garden and animals were eating it - you'd be appalled. But's that's what's happening in the oceans," says Sarah La Grue. "The reefs are being scorched,
Science/Nature

Crow vending machine skills ‘redefine intelligence’

[ad_1] Image copyright Sarah Jelbert Image caption The vending machines could be operated by paper "tokens" of a particular size A small South Pacific island is home to a crow with remarkable abilities that have scientists hooked. New Caledonian crows make and use tools - including a kind of fishing hook. They can solve complex problems and have even been recorded capturing grubs by repeatedly poking them with a stick
Science/Nature

Why scientists are counting seal pups in the Thames Estuary

[ad_1] Image copyright ZSL Jonathan Kemeys Sixty years ago the Thames Estuary was regarded as "biologically dead" and largely devoid of wildlife.But, in recent years seals have returned to the Thames as well as to the coastal and low-lying lands bordering the estuary. Last year, scientists recorded more than 3,500 harbour and grey seals.Now, they are starting the first count of seal pups to see how important the area is