Science/Nature

Intensive farming ‘least bad option’ for food and environment

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images Intensive, high-yielding agriculture may be the best way to meet growing demand for food while conserving biodiversity, say researchers. But their study says the approach makes sense only if it is linked to more wilderness being spared the plough.Intensive farming is said to create high levels of pollution and damage the environment more than organic farming.However, this report suggests that contrary to perceptions, this is
Science/Nature

Cities lead the way on curbing carbon emissions

[ad_1] Image copyright Chesnot Image caption A wind turbine installed in Paris ahead of the Cop21 climate conference in 2015 With many countries struggling to cut their carbon, new data suggests that major cities are making substantial strides to stem their emissions.Twenty-seven cities, including Warsaw, Barcelona and Sydney, saw CO2 peak in 2012 and then go into decline.As well as moving to green energy, the cities have provided affordable alternatives
Science/Nature

Salford scientists show how cars could power your home

[ad_1] Scientists at the University of Salford say they have devised a new way of saving on domestic electricity bills with a system that allows the power stored in an electric car to be transferred to a home.It is envisaged that recharging cars when demand is low and returning energy to the grid when it is high, so-called vehicle-to-grid technology, could help householders generate income and support the increasing use
Science/Nature

Ig Nobel win for kidney stone removing roller-coaster

[ad_1] Image copyright Jacob Ammentorp Lund Image caption Thrills, spills and kidney stone removal: Everything you could wish for from a roller-coaster ride Riding on some types of roller-coaster is an effective way of removing kidney stones.This is the conclusion of research that has won this year's Ig Nobel Prize for Medicine.The US researchers who carried out the work recommend that those afflicted with the condition should regularly use the
Science/Nature

‘A single piece of plastic’ can kill sea turtles, says study

[ad_1] Image copyright Google A new study suggests that ingesting even a single piece of plastic can be deadly for sea turtles.Researchers found there was a one in five chance of death for a turtle who consumed just one item - rising to 50% for 14 pieces. The team found that younger turtles are at a higher risk of dying from exposure to plastic than adults. The authors say their
Science/Nature

Hen harrier disappears after satellite tag stops working

[ad_1] Image copyright Guy Anderson Image caption Heulwen had left her nest in Gwynedd and had been flying across north Wales A rare bird of prey mysteriously disappeared when her satellite tag stopped transmitting after she flew across Snowdonia. Hen harrier Heulwen was last known to be near Ruabon Mountain, Wrexham, on 29 August. A tag continues to transmit even when the bird dies, and with the disappearance of another
Science/Nature

Robots ahoy! Mapping Earth’s surface

[ad_1] Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionSEA-KIT and its submersible work in tandem to map the sea floor One of the big favourites to win the ocean-mapping XPRIZE has formally confirmed its presence in the final. The GEBCO-Nippon Foundation Alumni Team has just completed 24-hour trials of its technology and is ready for the competition's ultimate challenge. This requires a mapping system inside a day to survey
Science/Nature

Who killed the largest birds that ever lived?

[ad_1] Image copyright Zoological Society of London Image caption The bones of the elephant bird were found at Christmas River in Madagascar Prehistoric humans are under suspicion of wiping out the largest birds that ever lived after fossilised bones were discovered with telltale cut marks.According to scientists, it's evidence that the elephant birds of Madagascar were hunted and butchered for food.The remains have been dated to about 10,000 years ago.Until
Science/Nature

Smarty pants: Robot trousers could keep the elderly mobile

[ad_1] Image copyright Uni Bristol Image caption New mobility tech: (L) A stiffening "cuff" to support the knee; (R) artificial muscles (background) can raise a robotic leg Johnathan Rossiter proudly displays his new trousers. Brightly coloured and fit for the running track, but packing more than just Lycra. They'll be robotic."We are all going to get older and our mobility is going to reduce," he says. "What we want to