Science/Nature

Iceman’s last meal was high-fat, high-calorie feast

[ad_1] Image copyright SouthtyrolarchaeologymuseumEuracM.Samadelli Image caption The man's stomach is examined Goat's fat and wild venison, plus sides of ancient wheat and bracken.It's not a menu likely to appear on Masterchef, but for some of our ancestors it was a nutritious feast.Scientists have revealed that the last supper of Oetzi the Iceman was well-balanced but also alarmingly high in fat.The man lived 5,300 years ago and met his death on
Science/Nature

Source of cosmic ‘ghost’ particle revealed

[ad_1] Image copyright IceCube/NSF Image caption IceCube's sensitive detector sits beneath the Antarctic ice Ghost-like neutrinos have been puzzling scientists for decades.Part of the family of fundamental particles that make up all known matter, they hurtle unimpeded through the Universe, interacting with almost nothing. The majority shoot right through the Earth as though it isn't even there, making them exceptionally difficult to detect and study.Despite this, researchers have worked out
Science/Nature

Whale killing: Iceland accused of slaughtering rare whale

[ad_1] Image copyright Hard to Port Image caption An image showing the fin that experts say is evidence that this is a blue whale Whalers in Iceland have killed what appears to be a blue whale, one of the largest creatures left on the planet.Photographic evidence from campaigners opposed to whaling show a large animal being butchered for export.Several experts have concluded from these pictures that it's a juvenile male
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Swarms of moon jellyfish like ‘oil slick’ off Ceredigion coast

[ad_1] When dolphin spotters saw a sea of pink in the waters off the coast of Ceredigion they thought it was an oil slick.But when they got closer they realised the colourful pattern was actually being caused by thousands of jellyfish. Skipper Jonathan Evans, of New Quay Dolphin Spotting Boat Trip, said the swarm - believed to be moon jellyfish - stretched for about 40m (130ft) across the water."I've been
Science/Nature

Killing rats could save coral reefs

[ad_1] Image copyright other The much maligned rat is not a creature many would associate with coral reefs. But scientists studying reefs on tropical islands say the animals directly threaten the survival of these ecosystems. A team working on the Chagos Islands in the Indian Ocean found that invasive rats on the islands are a "big problem" for coral reefs.Rats decimate seabird populations, in turn decimating the volume of bird
Science/Nature

Earliest evidence of humans outside Africa

[ad_1] Image copyright Prof Zhaoyu Zhu Scientists say they've found the earliest evidence of a human presence outside Africa.Ancient tools discovered in China suggest primitive humans were in the region as early as 2.12 million years ago.They are about 270,000 years older than the previous earliest evidence, which consists of bones and stone tools from Dmanisi in Georgia.The research, by a Chinese-British team, appears in the journal Nature.The stone artefacts
Science/Nature

Were the Romans the first whale hunters?

[ad_1] Image copyright D. Bernal-Casasola, University of Cadiz Image caption Baelo Claudia: An ancient Roman town in southern Spain Whale bones unearthed at Roman ruins suggest the animals were hunted by humans as long as 2,000 years ago.Genetic fingerprinting evidence points to the presence of right and grey whales in the Mediterranean Sea, where they may have been targeted by Roman fishing fleets.Until now, the Basque people were thought to
Science/Nature

How to build a real time machine

[ad_1] Image copyright BBC / Thomas Scheidl Image caption Ron Mallett built a device that illustrates principles he believes could be used to build a time machine Travelling in time might sound like a flight of fancy, but some physicists think it might really be possible. BBC Horizon looked at some of the most promising ideas for turning this staple of science fiction into reality.Ron Mallett has a dream: He
Science/Nature

Major sewage pollution incidents increase

[ad_1] Image copyright Environment Agency Image caption Pollution: The worst type of incidents are on the increase Water companies are still not doing enough to protect streams and rivers, the Environment Agency reports.It says whilst general water quality is higher than it's been for 100 years, the number of the worst pollution incidents has actually grown.Most of these involved raw or partly treated sewage flowing into watercourses.The industry body, Water