Science/Nature

Gene editing wipes out mosquitoes in the lab

[ad_1] Image copyright SPL Image caption Anopheles gambiae is one of the species responsible for spreading malaria Researchers have used gene editing to completely eliminate populations of mosquitoes in the lab.The team tested their technique on the mosquito Anopheles gambiae, which transmits malaria.They altered part of a gene called doublesex, which determines whether an individual mosquito develops as a male or as a female. This allowed the Imperial College London
Science/Nature

Who was the mysterious gardener Miss Harrison?

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Women have gardened for centuries, but the profession was once a male-dominated world It's a tale of intrigue set at the turn of the 20th century in the seemingly genteel gardens of Victorian Britain.Keen horticulturalists sit examinations in the principles of gardening - from the names and orders of common plants, to soils, good and bad.They compete across the country for a prestigious
Science/Nature

Report slams ‘high flying’ UN environment chief

[ad_1] Image copyright YASUYOSHI CHIBA Image caption UN Environment executive director Erik Solheim The head of the UN body that leads on sustainability and green issues has been criticised for extensive and expensive air travel. A draft internal audit, obtained by the Guardian and seen by the BBC, says that Erik Solheim's actions risked the reputation of UN Environment.The report says he incurred costs of $488,518 (£373,557) while travelling for
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All the plastic you can and cannot recycle

[ad_1] Most people are trying their best to recycle plastic - but the many different ways in which recycling is collected by different councils has left people confused. What can be recycled and what can't? We are putting more plastic in the recycling than ever before - but pictures of sea life tangled in all manner of waste plastic mean the pressure is on to do more. The government is
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Earliest animal fossils are identified

[ad_1] Image copyright Ilya Bobrovskiy Image caption The affiliations of Dickinsonia had previously been unclear Scientists have identified the earliest known animal in the geological record.It's a 558-million-year-old oval-shaped creature that may have borne a superficial resemblance to a segmented jellyfish.Researchers found specimens of the creature, known as Dickinsonia, that was so well preserved they still contained molecules of cholesterol.This fat is a hallmark of animal life, the team reports
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Giant pandas can tell a mate from their calls

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images Scientists have investigated the calls of giant pandas - and it's not good news for animals seeking a date. Pandas can identify each other from their sheep-like bleats at a distance of up to 20 metres, research found.But they can only decipher the sex of a potential mate if they are less than 10 metres away.In contrast, animals living on the open savannah, such as
Science/Nature

Hayabusa-2: Japan’s rovers ready for touchdown on asteroid

[ad_1] Image copyright Jaxa Image caption Rovers 1A and 1B (left and centre), alongside Minerva II-2 (right) which will be released at a later date Japan's space agency is preparing to deploy two robotic explorers to the surface of an asteroid.On Friday, the Hayabusa-2 spacecraft will despatch a pair of "rovers" to the 1km-wide space rock known as Ryugu.Rover 1A and Rover 1B will move around by hopping in Ryugu's
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Cane toad DNA breakthrough ‘may help stop’ toxic pest

[ad_1] Image copyright UNSW Image caption Cane toads are highly adaptive and release a destructive toxin Scientists say they have unlocked the DNA blueprint of the cane toad, raising fresh hopes of slowing the animal's destruction of habitats.The amphibian, native to South America, has become a prolific pest since it was introduced in other parts of the world last century.In Australia, it has spread rapidly and had a deadly impact
Science/Nature

RemoveDebris: UK satellite nets ‘space junk’

[ad_1] Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionThe satellite RemoveDebris will use a net and a harpoon to clean up space junk A British satellite has successfully deployed a net in orbit to demonstrate how to capture space debris. The event took place more than 300km above the Earth.It was part of a series of trials that will showcase different technologies to remove the redundant hardware now circling