Science/Nature

Spy satellites reveal extent of Himalayan glacier loss

[ad_1] Image copyright NRO/USGS Image caption The Hexagon images were declassified in 2011 and digitised for scientific study Images from Cold War spy satellites have revealed the dramatic extent of ice loss in the Himalayan glaciers.Scientists compared photographs taken by a US reconnaissance programme with recent spacecraft observations and found that melting in the region has doubled over the last 40 years.The study shows that since 2000, glaciers heights have
Science/Nature

UK ‘likely’ to host critical climate conference next year

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Thousands of negotiators and campaigners gather at the annual Conference of the Parties The UK looks set to be the host of a critical climate conference next year, after agreeing a partnership with its main rival Italy. It's regarded as the most important gathering on climate change since the Paris agreement was signed in 2015.Under the partnership deal, the UK will host the
Science/Nature

‘Boaty McBoatface’ maps deep ocean water

[ad_1] Image copyright P.Abrahamsen/BAS Image caption The expedition was the new sub's first major scientific outing Intrepid submarine Boaty McBoatface has made its first significant discovery, say UK scientists.The autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) has built a 3D map of deep ocean waters as they move away from Antarctica.Researchers previously had limited data to show these currents were warming.Boaty's investigations can now confirm that turbulence is causing warm water at mid-depths
Science/Nature

Atlantic Ocean ‘running out of breath’

[ad_1] Image copyright Sid Frisby Image caption A remotely-operated underwater vehicle is used to gather footage of the coral mounds of the Mingulay reef off the west coast of Scotland A huge international research programme has been launched to assess the health of the Atlantic Ocean. The iAtlantic project is the biggest ever mounted in the planet's second largest ocean. It involves more than 30 partners, funded by the EU,
Science/Nature

Dogs’ eyes evolve to appeal to humans

[ad_1] If a dog has eyes that seem to be telling you something or demanding your attention, it could be evolution's way of manipulating your feelings. Researchers have found that dogs have evolved muscles around their eyes, which allow them to make expressions that particularly appeal to humans.A small facial muscle allows dog eyes to mimic an "infant-like" expression which prompts a "nurturing response".The study says such "puppy eyes" helped
Science/Nature

The family-of-four living off grid

[ad_1] Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionThe Watkinson family live self sufficiently in Wales The government proposes reducing UK greenhouse gas emissions to almost zero by 2050, under a new plan to tackle climate change. The Victoria Derbyshire programme met a family who live self sufficiently and provide a glimpse of the kind of changes we may all need to make."The leap - handing your notice in,
Science/Nature

A bridge made of grass

[ad_1] Image copyright Jordi Busque Every year the last remaining Inca rope bridge still in use is cast down and a new one erected across the Apurimac river in the Cusco region of Peru. The Q'eswachaka bridge is woven by hand and has been in place for at least 600 years. Once part of the network that linked the most important cities and towns of the Inca empire, it was
Science/Nature

‘Cryoegg’ to explore under Greenland Ice Sheet

[ad_1] Image copyright E.Bagshaw/Cardiff University Image caption If Greenland were to lose all its ice, it would add 7m to global sea level UK scientists head to Greenland this week to trial new sensors that can be placed under its 2km-thick ice sheet. The instruments are designed to give researchers unique information on the way glaciers slide towards the ocean. Dubbed "Cryoeggs", the devices will report back on the behaviour
Science/Nature

Saving sharks: One woman’s mission to protect the hammerhead

[ad_1] Image copyright Edward Herreo Mision Swimming off Cocos Island in the Pacific Ocean, Ilena Zanella had her first close encounter with hammerhead sharks.As social creatures, the sharks gather in their hundreds, and soon she found herself surrounded. Easily spooked by the bubbles coming from her diving equipment, the sharks appeared shy, vulnerable and beautiful."I saw the vulnerability of this endangered species," she says. "This experience changed my life and