Science/Nature

The coffees you’ve never heard of which face extinction

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images Image caption We drink two coffees out of more than 100 types growing naturally The first full assessment of risks to the world's coffee plants shows that 60% of 124 known species are on the edge of extinction. More than 100 types of coffee tree grow naturally in forests, including two used for the coffee we drink.Scientists say the figure is "worrying", as wild coffee
Science/Nature

World’s ‘loneliest’ frog gets a date

[ad_1] Image copyright Robin Moore, Global Wildlife Conservaqtion Image caption Romeo (L) is to meet Juliet (R) A frog believed to be the last of his kind in the world has been granted a reprieve from solitude.Romeo, known as the world's loneliest frog, has spent 10 years in isolation at an aquarium in Bolivia.Scientists say they have found him a Juliet after an expedition to a remote Bolivian cloud forest.Five
Science/Nature

Cern plans even larger hadron collider for physics search

[ad_1] Image copyright Cern Image caption The Future Circular Collider is four times the circumference and ten times the power of the current collider Cern has published its ideas for a £20bn successor to the Large Hadron Collider, given the working name of Future Circular Collider (FCC).The Geneva based particle physics research centre is proposing an accelerator that is almost four times longer and ten times more powerful.The aim is
Science/Nature

Concerns over increase in toxic brine from desalination plants

[ad_1] Image copyright abayliss Image caption A desalination plant in Saudi Arabia, a country that produces one-fifth of the brine in the world Desalination plants around the world are pumping out far more salt laden brine than previously believed, according to a new study.The salty effluent is a by-product of efforts to extract fresh water from the sea. Researchers found that plants are now producing 50% more of this chemical
Science/Nature

Watch how air pollution moves across Europe

[ad_1] Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionNitrogen dioxide air pollution 5-10 January (sequence is played twice) This is what pollution looks like on a European scale.The animation shows the concentration and movement through the atmosphere of nitrogen dioxide.NO₂ is a problem gas that is produced primarily by vehicle exhausts and industrial activity via the burning of fossil fuels.The map covers a sample period from 5 to 10
Science/Nature

The women fighting fast fashion waste

[ad_1] Are you a fast fashion victim?Claire and Emily run a hub in Manchester that takes old clothes and fabrics and transforms them into new garments.They teach upcycling, mending and ancient Japanese dyeing techniques at the hub, with the hope people will stop buying new. An estimated 235 million items of clothing were sent to UK landfill in 2017, according to a report by Sainsbury's. This clip is originally from
Science/Nature

Mathematician Sir Michael Atiyah dies aged 89

[ad_1] Image copyright Joe Atiyah One of the world's foremost mathematicians, Prof Sir Michael Atiyah, has died at the age of 89. Sir Michael, who worked at Cambridge University before he retired, made outstanding contributions to geometry and topology. Sir Michael was a recipient of the highest honour in mathematics, a Fields Medal. He died on Friday.His brother Joe told BBC News he had been one of the most important
Science/Nature

SpaceX launch completes Iridium satellite refresh

[ad_1] Image copyright SpaceX Image caption This was the eighth and final launch in the refurbishment of the Iridium network Ten spacecraft have launched from California to complete the $3bn refurbishment of the original satellite phone system, Iridium. A SpaceX Falcon rocket carried the platforms aloft. They will go live in the network in the coming weeks.The original Iridium constellation was put up in the late 90s to link calls
Science/Nature

Giant hi-tech tomato glasshouse set to produce millions of the fruit

[ad_1] One of the UK's "most technologically-advanced" glasshouses is set to produce millions of tomatoes.Based just outside Ipswich in Suffolk, it houses 250,000 tomato plants and is capable of producing 150 million tomatoes a year.The glasshouse will eventually stretch for 1km (0.6 miles) in length, in a project costing £30m.The first crop of tomatoes from the site will hit supermarket shelves in February. [ad_2] Source link