Science/Nature

Scientists: Why we should appreciate wasps

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images Scientists have put together a map of the UK's wasp population, showing the distribution of key species.Data recorded by volunteers gives an insight into where wasps are living in the nation's grasslands, woodlands and towns.The researchers say wasps are a much maligned insect, which deserve more attention.Rather than being "bothersome and pointless", they are in fact beneficial insects, keeping other pests in check."Wasps are nature's
Science/Nature

Compassionate conservation is ‘seriously flawed’

[ad_1] Image caption Should brown rats be allowed to breed and multiply without their numbers being controlled? The idea that you cannot kill any animal is "fatally flawed" as a conservation concept, scientists argue.Conservation measures should concentrate on species or habitats rather than individual animals, they observe.Invasive species, they argue, often require mass culling of an animal in order to protect an endangered species.Under so called "compassionate conservation", such an
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Climate change: Will India’s election energy lead to CO2 rise?

[ad_1] Image caption India's CO2 emissions is predicted to roughly double by 2040 India's major political parties competing in the ongoing general elections have pledged free electricity to farmers, ambitious infrastructure projects and rapid expansion of the manufacturing sector. What impact could this have on carbon emissions in India, already the world's third largest CO2 producer?Hundreds of lorries each day haul tens of thousands of tonnes of coal out of
Science/Nature

Crickets have hit the high street – can they save the planet?

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Fancy some crispy crickets for lunch? Not that long ago, many of us would grimace at the idea of eating raw fish, crunching on kale or slurping on a chia smoothie. Now thousands of us munch on California rolls doused in soy sauce during our lunch break without a second thought. But what about adding some crispy crickets to your poke bowl?This week
Science/Nature

Bedbugs survived the dinosaur extinction event

[ad_1] Image copyright Mike Siva-Jothy Image caption Up close, the mouthparts the bugs use to suck blood are clearly visible A study that began as an investigation into the "utterly bizarre" way in which bedbugs reproduce has revealed they have existed for far longer than humans. DNA samples from 30 species of bedbug revealed the insects had been around for at least 115 million years. The blood-sucking parasites predate their
Science/Nature

Artificial life form has ‘synthetic DNA’

[ad_1] Image copyright Jason Chin Image caption Syn61 is shown here in the act of replicating and dividing. The cells are stained with a die to make them glow UK scientists have created an artificial version of the stomach bug E. coli that is based on an entirely synthetic form of DNA.At the same time, Syn61 as they are calling it, has had its genetic code significantly redesigned.It's been done
Science/Nature

Plastic pollution: Flip-flop tide engulfs ‘paradise’ island

[ad_1] Image copyright Silke Stuckenbrock Close to a million plastic shoes, mainly flip flops are among the torrent of debris washed up on an "unspoilt paradise" in the Indian Ocean. Scientists estimated that the beaches of Australia's Cocos (Keeling) Islands are strewn with around 414 million pieces of plastic pollution.They believe some 93% of it lies buried under the sand, say the researchers.They are concerned that the scale of concealed
Science/Nature

Antarctic instability ‘is spreading’ – BBC News

[ad_1] Image copyright Jeremy Harbeck Image caption Thwaites Glacier is out of balance, and its ice loss is accelerating Almost a quarter of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet can now be considered unstable, according to a new assessment of 25 years of satellite data.By unstable, scientists mean more ice is being lost from the region than is being replenished through snowfall.Some of the biggest glaciers have thinned by over 120m