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Greenland ice sheet hides huge ‘impact crater’

[ad_1] Image copyright NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM OF DENMARK Image caption Space view: The semi-circular margin of the ice sheet traces the outline of the crater What looks to be a large impact crater has been identified beneath the Greenland ice sheet. The 31km-wide depression came to light when scientists examined radar images of the island's bedrock. Investigations suggest the feature was probably dug out by a 1.5km-wide iron asteroid sometime
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Exoplanet discovered around neighbouring star

[ad_1] Image copyright ESO/M. Kornmesser Image caption Artwork: Barnard's Star b is thought to be quite cold Astronomers have discovered a planet around one of the closest stars to our Sun.Nearby planets like this are likely to be prime targets in the search for signatures of life, using the next generation of telescopes.The planet's mass is thought to be more than three times that of our own, placing it in
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‘Conservation successes’ bring hope for mountain gorilla

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Mountain gorilla: From critically endangered to endangered Conservation efforts appear to be paying off for some of the world's most charismatic animals, according to new assessments for the extinction Red List.Prospects look better for the mountain gorilla, after years of conservation measures, including anti-poaching and veterinary patrols.And numbers of two large whales are recovering, following hunting bans.However, other flora and fauna is declining.Species
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South Pole: Rock ‘hotspot’ causes ice sheet to sag

[ad_1] Image copyright TOM JORDAN Image caption The British Antarctic Survey flew one of its planes back and forth across the pole A "hotspot" is melting the base of the Antarctic Ice Sheet at the South Pole. The area affected is three times that of Greater London. Scientists suspect a combination of unusually radioactive rocks and geothermal springs may be responsible. The warm bedrock is removing some 6mm a year
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Climate change: Heatwaves ‘halve’ male insect fertility

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Beetles represent the largest insect group Heatwaves can damage the sperm of insects and make them almost sterile, according to new research.Scientists exposed beetles to experimental heatwaves in the laboratory, which resulted in reduced male fertility.The effects could be passed down to the beetles' offspring.Further work could shed light on whether climate change is a factor behind mass declines in insect populations, say
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Flushable wet wipes ‘causing sewer blockages’

[ad_1] All wet wipes sold as "flushable" in the UK have so far failed the water industry's disintegration tests, the BBC has found.Water companies say wet wipes don't break down and are causing blockages which cost millions to put right. Manufacturers insist their test is adequate and say sewer blockages are caused by people putting non-flushable wipes down the toilet.Wet wipes are sold for everything from make-up removal to surface
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Can listening to bees tell us why they are in decline?

[ad_1] Image copyright World Bee Project Image caption There are 20,000 species of bee, but many are under threat around the world Can artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning help save the world's bees? That's the hope of scientists who are scrambling to reverse the dramatic declines in bee populations.Bees are in trouble, but we're not quite sure why. It could be the overuse of insecticides; air pollution; warming temperatures;
Science/Nature

Mystery monkey: history of unique Xenothrix fossil revealed

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images Image caption The monkey, called the xenothrix, was closely related to the titi monkey which lives in the Amazon A mysterious extinct monkey from Jamaica that is unlike any other in the fossil record has South American roots, according to new evidence.DNA extracted from fossilised bones suggests the monkey first colonised the island 11 million years ago.It had no predators there and it evolved strange
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The ‘painted wolves’ of Zimbabwe

[ad_1] Image copyright ©Nicholas Dyer Image caption Staring competition: Painted wolves, or African wild dogs, do everything as a group - even facing up to a hyena They are stunning; there's no question. And the name, "painted wolves", seems so apt.Their dappled tan and black fur, shot through with flashes of white, dazzles in the sunlight. You're going to become very familiar with these creatures; you may even fall in
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EU moves to protect large carnivores

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Populations of brown bears have increased in many parts of Europe The EU is to allow farmers to receive full compensation for any damages caused by attacks from protected animals like lynxes, wolves and bears.Other expenses including installing electric fences or acquiring guard dogs to prevent damage will also be fully reimbursed. The EU says the move will help protect large predators in